Training Programs for College Graduates: Advice for Marketing Majors

ImageNorman Schwartz of NDS Financial Inc.and Amy Krakow of Propaganda Marketing Communications, both graduates of Brooklyn College, spoke to students in the Marketing Society on April 30, 2013 about careers in marketing and related areas in business.  Norm Schwartz emphasized the importance of getting hired in a company with a training program.  He said it over and over:  don’t look for a marketing position and don’t worry about the industry.  The industry is not important but getting into a training program is what’s crucial.  His path to success started with a solid training program in the shipping industry.  Later he moved out of the shipping industry, having attained executive status, and into the brokerage industry.  Now he does consulting.  Learning how all the divisions in a company function is essential.  If you can find a management training program with a marketing emphasis all the better but in a general management training program trainees generally have the option to choose which division they want to work in, and some people choose to do something very different than expected.  You may find that you prefer Human Resources to the Marketing department.  Training programs help broaden one’s horizons and they put you on a faster track to management than does an entry level position, says Norm Schwartz.  Many students at Brooklyn College hadn’t heard of training programs.  Often companies with training programs come to recruit on university campuses (this is a good article that will help you start finding companies with training program) http://career.csusb.edu/pdf/ManagementTrainingProgram_000.pdf.  Norm Schwartz advised that students research and identify companies and apply to them directly. “Training programs” said Norm Schwartz making reference to that famous line from the Graduate on plastics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSxihhBzCjk.  The bus stops here he said, get on it, whatever the training program. Image Amy Krakow offered different advice: go directly into the field in which you want to work.  People in marketing need two different strengths: intelligence and creativity.  She explained that the first step in working in marketing is to be able to successfully market yourself.  When people search for you online what do they find? Learn everything you can about a company you want to work for.  Who are the people who work there and what do they look like?  Find a way to capture their attention: it won’t be through a cover letter and resume sent to the HR department.  You need to be smarter, more creative and to know more than everyone else.  Some people have advantages but if you know more than they do and can do more you will get ahead in marketing.  She felt there was a danger to training programs:  you might get stuck working somewhere you hate, doing something you don’t want to do, and it will be hard to get out and to get back on track if your real goal is marketing.  She spoke of many facets of marketing: advertising, PR, research, social media and of opportunities in marketing departments in many firms in all kinds of industries from health care to technology firms.   Speaking a little of her own career path in the magazine industry she spoke of how while in the past marketing supported sales today sales can support marketing. Image

Thanks to Amy and Norm for conveying your knowledge of marketing and business to Brooklyn College students. 

ImageConnie Tejada, President of the Marketing Society

Call for Interns in Brooklyn: Art, Graphic Design, Social Media, Research and Development

Call for Interns in Brooklyn: Art, Graphic Design, Social Media, Research and Development

Not an Alternative describes itself as a hybrid arts collective and non-profit organization with a mission to affect popular understandings of events, symbols, and history.

Theyve annouced several internships:  Apply by April 26, 2013.

They “curate and produce interventions on immaterial and material space, leveraging the tools of architecture, exhibit design, branding, and public relations. Programs are hosted at a variety of venues, including our Brooklyn-based gallery No-Space”

Daily News Article on Punch Street Greetings

Daily News Article on Punch Street Greetings

I was interviewed in this article on a new online greeting card company.  I would have advised entrepreneur Keisha DePaz not to give up the day job so soon.  Education is something you never lose so she can always go back into the corporate world though it is hard to get back to the same position.  I think she needs to do a few things differently.  I was surprised she didn’t do something with digital cards.  There is a real need for more interesting digital cards for younger audiences: something beyond the watering can and the growing flower.  She created cards that you can order online and that she mails.  They need to have more interesting designs and lots of flexibility for the user so that I can pull in different elements to make my own card.  Learn from those who have been successful in the greeting card arena.  You need tabs like “Birthday” not “Youth”.  Anti-bullying cards?  Is this for first graders, adolescents?  The only people who will buy anti-bullying cards are overprotective mothers.  The website needs to be user friendly and fun.  All these things can be worked out but need to be done now when she is getting a lot of publicity.